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November, 23

Birth of Otto I - November 23
The Holy Roman Emperor Otto I was born on November 23, 912.
Otto I the Great was the son of Henry I and Matilda of Ringerlheim. He was Duke of Saxony, King of Germany, King of Italy, and "the first of the Germans to be called the emperor of Italy."
While Charlemagne was crowned emperor in 800, his empire had been divided amongst his grandsons, and following the assassination of Berengar of Friuli in 924, the imperial title had lain vacant for nearly forty years. On February 2, 962, Otto was crowned Emperor of what would later become the Holy Roman Empire.



Birth of John of Orleans - November 23
John of Orleans, Joan of Arc's right hand, was born on November 23, 1402.
John of Orleans, Count of Dunois (November 23, 1402 - November 24, 1468) was the illegitimate son of Louis d'Orleans by Mariette d'Enghien.
He was known as the "Bastard of Orleans" for most of his career.
This name identified him as a first cousin to the king and acting head of a cadet branch of the royal family during his half-brother's captivity.
He joined the civil war in France in the time of Charles VI on the side of the Armagnacs, and was captured by the Burgundians in 1418.
Released in 1420, he entered the service of the Dauphin Charles, fighting in the Hundred Years' War against English forces.
In the future, Count Dunois led the French defenses at the siege of Orléans. Together with Joan of Arc he relieved the siege. He joined her on the campaigns of 1429 and remained active after her death.

Did you know?UtnapishtimNPC - Utnapishtim
The Epic of Gilgamesh (Utnapishtim) is an epic poem from Ancient Mesopotamia and is among the earliest known works of literary fiction. Scholars believe that it originated as a series of Sumerian legends and poems about the mythological hero-king Gilgamesh, which were gathered into a longer Akkadian poem much later; the most complete version existing today is preserved on 12 clay tablets in the library collection of the 7th century BCE Assyrian king Ashurbanipal. It was originally titled He who Saw the Deep (Sha naqba īmuru) or Surpassing All Other Kings (Shūtur eli sharrī). Gilgamesh might have been a real ruler in the late Early Dynastic II period (ca. 27th century BC).[1]

The essential story revolves around the relationship between Gilgamesh, who has become distracted and disheartened by his rule, and a friend, Enkidu, who is half-wild and who undertakes dangerous quests with Gilgamesh. Much of the epic focuses on Gilgamesh's thoughts of loss following Enkidu's death. It is about their becoming human together, and has a high emphasis on immortality. A large portion of the book shows Gilgamesh's search for immortality after Enkidu's death.

The epic is widely read in translation, and the hero, Gilgamesh, has become an icon of popular culture.

Source: Wikipedia