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November, 21

Napoleon I's Berlin Decree - November 21
Hello, Atlantica Players.
Today is the day that Napoleon issued the Berlin Decree.
It was issued on November 21, 1806, following the French victory against Prussia at the Battle of Jena. The decree forbade the import of British goods into European countries allied with or dependent upon France, and installed the Continental System in Europe.
It eventually led to economic ruin for France, while little happened to the economy of Britain, which had control of Atlantic Ocean trade.
Other European nations removed themselves from the Continental System, which led in part to the downfall of Napoleon.



Thomas Gresham - November 21
The second topic for today is Thomas Gresham, who died on this day in 1579.
He was a financial advisor in England who urged Queen Elizabeth I to restore the debased currency of England, saying "Bad money drives out good."
This law specifically applies when there are two forms of money in circulation which are required by legal-tender laws to be accepted as having similar face values for economic transactions.
In 1858, this law was named after him.

Did you know?VampireMercenary - Vampire
Carmilla is a Gothic novella by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu. First published in 1872, it tells the story of a young woman's susceptibility to the attentions of a female vampire named Carmilla. Carmilla predates Bram Stoker's Dracula by 25 years, and has been adapted many times for cinema.

Illustration in Carmilla, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's vampire story

Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings who subsist by feeding on the life essence (generally in the form of blood) of living creatures, regardless of whether they are undead or a living person. Although vampiric entities have been recorded in many cultures, and may go back to "prehistoric times", the term vampire was not popularized until the early 18th century, after an influx of vampire superstition into Western Europe from areas where vampire legends were frequent, such as the Balkans and Eastern Europe, although local variants were also known by different names, such as vrykolakas in Greece and strigoi in Romania. This increased level of vampire superstition in Europe led to mass hysteria and in some cases resulted in corpses actually being staked and people being accused of vampirism.

While even folkloric vampires of the Balkans and Eastern Europe had a wide range of appearance ranging from nearly human to bloated rotting corpses, it was the success of John Polidori's 1819 novella The Vampyre that established the archetype of charismatic and sophisticated vampire; it is arguably the most influential vampire work of the early 19th century, inspiring such works as Varney the Vampire and eventually Dracula. The Vampyre was itself based on Lord Byron's unfinished story "Fragment of a Novel", also known as "The Burial: A Fragment", published in 1819.

However, it is Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula that is remembered as the quintessential vampire novel and which provided the basis of modern vampire fiction. Dracula drew on earlier mythologies of werewolves and similar legendary demons and "was to voice the anxieties of an age", and the "fears of late Victorian patriarchy". The success of this book spawned a distinctive vampire genre, still popular in the 21st century, with books, films, video games, and television shows. The vampire is such a dominant figure in the horror genre that literary historian Susan Sellers places the current vampire myth in the "comparative safety of nightmare fantasy".

Source: Wikipedia (Carmilla)
Source: Wikipedia (Vampire)